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Drab to Fab!!! Reception area floors Stained

Drab to Fab!!! Reception area floors Stained

Jun 28, 2017

Finally we got our resident in house painter Pino to come in and stain/polish our reception area floorboards and paint our counter in Matt Black. We went for a beautiful japanese black stain mixed with rich brown and tried to retain the character of the original wear and tear by giving the floorboards a light sand only. We think its come up great and the reception area make over is coming together. We will be extensively renovating and improving the shop aesthetics during this winter period, so stay tuned and see the transformation unfold!!
Why tattoo schools shouldn’t exist

Why tattoo schools shouldn’t exist

Jun 28, 2017

by DEVON PRESTON Just a Few of the Many Reasons Why Tattoo Schools are Terrible Tattooing can be traced back centuries and the art of passing down information from masters to students has been around since the industry began. In every culture where tattooing is found, from Japanese to Polynesian to Aboriginal, there has been some type of mentor/apprentice relationship and to this day, the practice is still incredibly sacred. However, over the past several years, there has been a rebellion from this norm, which has led to the establishment of tattoo schools. And while schools are generally perceived in a positive light, tattoo schools are extremely different and frankly, should not exist. To learn why we think that tattoo schools are unethical and disrespectful to the tattoo industry, keep on reading. What is a Tattoo School? Tattoo schools are institutes that train individuals to become tattoo artists through either a one year accelerated program or two years part time. Students pay tuition, similar to other trade colleges, and they learn to tattoo in a classroom environment, through a tattoo internship, or in workshops. When students complete the program and “graduate,” they then go on to work for one of the school’s shops or branch out to other shops. Why They Suck While many tattoo schools market themselves as being a better option than a traditional apprenticeship, this couldn’t be further from the case and they are extremely problematic for countless reasons. Here are just a few of the reasons why tattoo schools should not exist. Tattooing Values Tradition Tradition and the respect for tradition are extremely important in the tattoo industry. No matter what kind of apprenticeship you have, you are always taught about the importance of tattooing being passed down from mentors to apprentices. Tattoo schools do not account for this essential tradition and don’t allow for students to be a part of this process
Tattoo Artists Around The Nation Are Standing Up To Tattoo Schools

Tattoo Artists Around The Nation Are Standing Up To Tattoo Schools

Jun 28, 2017

Tattooers Are Fed Up With Corrupt Tattoo Schools—Here's What You Need to Know by DEVON PRESTON A few weeks ago, we put out an article on tattoo schools, however, after speaking to artists, Myke Chambers, Eric Perfect, and Chad Knight, we learned that these scammers are much worse than we ever imagined. If you believe that tattoo schools are out there in doing good in the world, well think again because the tattoo industry will tell you otherwise. Chambers, Perfect, Knight, and several other Philadelphia artists recently staged a peaceful protest against the Academy of Responsible Tattooing (a.k.a A.R.T), a chain of tattoo schools called “Body Art and Soul” that has been growing rapidly in numbers. They promise prospective students that they will become successful artists in a mere nine months, just as long as they shell out cash for the program. They believe that tattooers don’t need to go through an apprenticeship to work in the business and that a school is their best possible option. However, as these artists will tell you, this couldn’t be further from the truth. A.R.T is a pyramid scheme at best, a scamming agency employing to prey on ignorant prospective artists who have been “burned” in the process of getting an apprenticeship. They’re charging students upfront for a tattoo education and instantly blacklisting them from working at any tattoo shop beside the ones set up for the schools. They are manipulating impressionable people looking for a career change that tattooing will make them rich and famous—when really, the people running this company have no understanding or respect for the tattoo industry. However, tattooers are working to put a stop to the madness that is A.R.T and it’s time that the public learned what these schools are really about. Inked: How are these schools luring in students? “They do a seminar where they charge $350 and they say it’s to teach how these people to get an apprenticeship. They teach you about cross contamination, how to set up a tattoo machine, and then they have you tattoo a grapefruit. But they really do is try to size you up for their school.”—Myke Chambers Inked: Why are tattoo schools much a bad idea? “There are a million reasons why I think they’re messed up. For the general public’s viewpoint, of people who don’t know tattooing, they think that we’re being elitist because we want people to go through apprenticeships. But we’re not elitists, we only want people that work with their blood, sweat, and tears. They think that apprenticeships are where you get hazed, bullied and that just the shop bitch—but that’s not the case. An apprenticeship is also not charged, but it’s paid off by cleaning, doing tubes, and answering phones—which are things that tattooers doing anyways. I’ve been tattooing for twenty years and I still clean and mop the floors or take out the trash. And then people from the outside will say that we’re just afraid of the competition. I personally am not afraid of competition and no one at my shop needs to worry about the competition. The only thing that I’m afraid to come out of a tattoo school is someone who does a bad tattoo, spreads diseases, and stuff like that. The general public thinks that it’s a tattoo shop and that it’s a qualified business, so they go in there to get a tattoo from a qualified artist but in reality, they’re getting a tattoo from someone who is still in training. The main problem is that this is a nine month school, which is better than the two-week schools, but it’s not much better. Any type of school is not okay. If they had instructors who were the best tattooers in the world leading these classes and teaching theses classes, it’s still not okay. Because when you have twenty to thirty people in these classes for nine months, they cannot get a job in an established tattoo shop. So what they have to do is open their own shop or work in the tattoo school’s shops. So this is basically a big huge scam because the people running it know that their graduates cannot get jobs. These guys know that they can’t work anywhere besides these tattoo shops and they are unpaid what an actual tattooer would make. Every time this happens, twenty new tattoo shops in the town, the market is already over saturated. Not this generation, maybe the next one, or long after I’m dead—tattooing could become a hobby that people just do out of their house. Because if there’s a tattoo shop on every street, no one is going to be able to make money. There may be a hair salon on every street, but a haircut grows out and you keep going back. There are constantly more people turning 18 every day but there are not enough people to support all of these tattoo shops that are going to be opening.”—Myke Chambers. Inked: What is the most upsetting part of this scheme? “The most upsetting thing is that they promise you, if you pay a certain amount of money, that you’re going to be a certified tattoo artist. I don’t know what the fuck that means because it doesn’t exist. You’re going to walk into my shop with a certificate that says you went to tattoo school, I’m going to tell you to get the fuck out of here. To me, it’s a joke. The people that are the “educators” maybe have two to five years of experience, and these are guys that learned there—they’ve never been anywhere else other than the umbrella of tattoo schools. The main guy, no one knows who he is. He acts like a world famous tattoo artist, but no one knows him and his work’s terrible. And the guy who’s his partner isn’t even tattooed! He’s a money man. To me, this is corporate tattooing. But that’s not what tattooing is about. This is something that’s handed down from a mentor to a mentee. I hung out in shops and got tattooed, if I saw something out of place I fixed it or saw something that was dirty, I clean it. And that was even before I had my foot in the door. No one is willing to do that these days. They watch TV and say ‘I can do that.’ I would say that 90% of the people taking these classes are basically customers. We make it look easy because we’ve been doing it so long and they think that it’s easy. And the tattoo schools say it’s that easy, which it’s not. They’re basically scamming people. I’ve heard about 50 horror stories within the last month of people who’ve gone there.”—Eric Perfect
Sandra Sarr (31 July - 1 Aug)

Sandra Sarr (31 July - 1 Aug)

Jun 13, 2017

We are pleased to announce Sanni from Modern Ink in Fremantle W.A will be joining us for 2 days and has times available to tattoo. Please contact us via email info@voodooink.com.au for more info and visit her instagram @sannisaartattoo and follow! 
Liverpool Tattoo studio raises thousands for Manchester victims with bee tattoo marathon

Liverpool Tattoo studio raises thousands for Manchester victims with bee tattoo marathon

Jun 1, 2017

The tattoos are a symbol of solidarity with victims A Liverpool tattoo studio raised thousands by offering the distinctive bee tattoos which have become a symbol of solidarity with victims of the Manchester terror attack.The Devil’s Club on Stanley Street raised £4,150 through the event, organised by Stalybridge tattoo artist Sam Barber. Tattoo artists Adam Allward, Craig Garner and Dean Coughlin worked for nine hours straight on Sunday - carrying out 83 bee tattoos at £50 each. The studio also offered tattoos to people from Manchester who were unable to get one from inundated Manchester studios. Co-owner Adam said: “Everyone was finding their own way to help the families of the victims and as tattoo artists this is a way we could do our own little part. “Also with Liverpool being so close to Manchester it was a way to offer support to them and also offer people from both Liverpool and Manchester the chance to get a bee.” Proud owners of the tattoos took to social media to show off their designs. The bee motif harks back to Manchester’s role in the Industrial Revolution as a centre of textile manufacturing, with busy mill workers commonly referred to as bees in a hive. To find out more about the Manchester Bee Tattoo appeal go to the JustGiving page here, where you can also make a donation.
Sharna Lee Turner (May 26)

Sharna Lee Turner (May 26)

May 19, 2017

Sharna will be joining us again on the 26th May for a week. Sharna was just recently a resident tattooer with us but decided to move to the warmer climate of Queensland. As a busy tattooist and mum, she has made some time for a quick visit. Her work is super clean and smooth blackwork inspired by botanicals and geometry. Please visit her facebook https://www.facebook.com/sharnalee.turner for any availabilities 
Gift Vouchers available In Store NOW!

Gift Vouchers available In Store NOW!

May 15, 2017

We still have a handful of vouchers left in store until we run our next batch. They are a beautiful double sided graphic presented in a matt black envelope and are the perfect gift for a friend or loved one. They are non transferable and expire in 12 months. Minimum amount put on the voucher is $100. Call the shop on 9593 9066 or swing by to collect!
Inside the World’s Only Surviving Tattoo Shop For Medieval Pilgrims

Inside the World’s Only Surviving Tattoo Shop For Medieval Pilgrims

May 15, 2017

The Razzouk family has been inking religious pilgrims in the Middle East for 700 years by ANNA FELICITY FRIEDMAN. www.atlasobscura.com In Jerusalem’s Old City today, you can find a uniquely obscure historical relic—the sole surviving pilgrimage tattoo business, Razzouk Ink. It’s a place where ancient artifacts meet contemporary machines, rich history intersects with modern technology. Twenty years ago, as a budding tattoo scholar, I first read about the adventures of Christian pilgrims to the Holy Land and the indelible souvenirs they had inscribed under their skin. I never expected to one day get the opportunity to follow in their footsteps and receive my own. Just inside the Jaffa Gate in Jerusalem’s Old City, you can duck down the second side street to the left, as I did, finding respite from the beating sun and leaving the bustle of the crowded main square. A tiny shop, almost dwarfed by its prominent sign, lies across a quiet cobblestone road. If you didn’t know anything about the incredible, centuries-long history of the family who runs this particular shop, the sign’s tagline might cause you to do a double-take: “Tattoo With Heritage Since 1300” it reads. For 700 years the Razzouk family has been tattooing marks of faith. Coptic Christians who settled in Jerusalem four generations ago, the family had learned the craft of tattooing in Egypt, where the devout wear similar inscriptions. Evidence of such tattoos dates back at least as far as the 8th century in Egypt and the 6th century in the Holy Land, where Procopius of Gaza wrote of tattooed Christians bearing designs of crosses and Christ’s name. Early tattoos self-identified indigenous Christians in the Middle East and Egypt. Later, as the faithful came to the Holy Land on pilgrimage, the practice expanded to offer these travelers permanent evidence of their devotion and peregrination. Upon entering Razzouk Ink, you will discover a blend of stone walls and exposed beams lending antique character to the space, while the sterile tattoo parlor hides behind a wall. A museum-like case holds family antiques, and an exhibition of pictures on the walls offers glimpses into the family’s past. Family lore dates the Razzouk’s involvement in this cultural practice to 1300, starting first in Egypt among Coptic (Orthodox) Christians and later in the Holy Land for Christians from a variety of backgrounds. “My ancestors were always in association with the church therefore it might be they learned this practice from there,” says Wassim Razzouk, the current family tattooer. Pilgrims’ accounts dating to the late 16th century offer a glimpse into the era’s tattoo culture, and how purveyors such as the Razzouks must have tattooed back then, with sewing needles bound to the end of a wooden handle. Such accounts report designs that have become enduring pilgrimage tattoos, such as the Jerusalem cross—a motif consisting of a central, equal-arm symbol flanked by four smaller versions—along with images of Christ, Latin mottoes, dates in banners, and more. A comprehensive description of the historical technique comes from Reverend Henry Maundrell, a chaplain for the English Levant Company’s office in Aleppo, Syria. In 1697, on the day before Easter, he witnessed the tattooing process in Jerusalem on a group of Christian pilgrims traveling with him.  Jirius, great-grandfather to the current generation of family tattooers at Razzouk Ink, settled in Jerusalem’s Old City in the late 19th century, bringing knowledge of tattooing and a set of antique stencil blocks that bore the traditional designs, one dating as far back as 1749. Several other families tattooed in the Holy Land at the time, including Armenian competitors in Jerusalem, with other practices in Bethlehem and Jaffa. But during the Israeli War of Independence in 1947, many people of Palestinian heritage fled their homes, along with Coptic Christians like the Razzouks, who left for neighboring Jordan. Pilgrimage tattooing became a dying art. After the conflict cooled off, the Razzouks returned to Jerusalem, where they alone became the primary custodians of this craft. “After 1948, [Jirius’ son] Yacoub was the only tattooer left in Israel,” says Anton of his father, a situation that lasted until the 1960s, when Western-style tattooing began to emerge. Yacoub became the sole practitioner of this service for the Coptic pilgrims who trekked to the Holy Land, particularly at Easter, to worship and mark their faith. Anton relates the story of one man whose arms were covered in dates—each representing a consecutive year of pilgrimage from the 1930s on. Following the Six-Day War in 1967, however, restrictions on travel to Israel by Egyptians made it considerably more difficult for these annual pilgrimages to happen. The family carried on. Anton took over tattooing from his father, with a steady enough stream of customers. It seemed that the business might die with him, as none of his children were initially interested in carrying on the family craft. But several years ago, Anton’s son Wassim, who had gone to college for hospitality management, became interested in tattoos through his passion for motorcycle culture. The weight of 700 years of family heritage suddenly hit the young man, impelling him to preserve these tokens of faith and travel. Wassim set about learning the business from his father (now retired) and arranged for mentorship by modern tattooers on new techniques and contemporary health and safety standards. In this post-AIDS era, gone are days of being able to use the same tattoo needles used over and over for a year or more, or staunching bleeding with bandages lifted from one customer and applied to the next. The melding of modern hygiene practices with hundreds of years of history allows this historic business to march into a future that must consider potential dangers like bloodborne pathogens, despite trusting in God to prevent unfortunate outcomes. Wassim revitalized and reinvented the business, expanding beyond traditional pilgrimage tattoos to other genres. His wife Gabrielle joined him, and they work side by side. The family hopes that at least one of their children will follow in their footsteps, but seem disinclined to pressure any of them to do so, a testament to their faith in the power of heritage and a call to service that will likely emerge on its own. Modern designs aside, the pilgrimage tattoos are what compel people to travel hundreds, even thousands of miles to the Razzouks’ shop. There’s nowhere else on Earth where one can get a traditional Christian design rendered from stencil blocks of such antiquity (some practitioners exist in Cairo, but they lack the Razzouk’s deep family history and collection of verified artifacts). Wassim has developed new techniques for inscribing traditional pilgrimage tattoos faster and better. He starts by rubbing the stencil block with purple ink from carbon-copy paper—a transfer medium used worldwide by contemporary tattooers for decades, but prior to Wassim’s innovation, never used for pilgrimage stamps. This offers significant benefit over the previous techniques, which would dip the block in stamp-pad ink or powdered charcoal—a fugitive transfer pattern subject to smearing and disappearing during the tattooing process. Now, a durable purple guide holds fast to the skin while the image can be rendered permanently via machine. Although Wassim’s grandfather Yacoub pioneered the use of machines for pilgrimage tattoos, Wassim has perfected a technique that achieves a look that mimics what the blocks look like when printed on paper—he inscribes a first pass over the lines of the stencil, then he goes back and retraces every line, adding graphic weight and ensuring a bold, black motif visible from a distance. In the 21st century, tattoos have emerged as popular travel souvenirs, but Razzouk Ink offers a truly unique experience—a link to hundreds of years of history through a visceral transaction of bloodletting and pain. While in that fuzzy zone that emerges from endorphins as a tattoo progresses, I channeled the many travelers who have endured a similar fate. And later, post healing, as the ink began to settle into my skin, a glance at the enduring mark conjured a heavy mix of memory and tradition.  
How Tattoos Went From Subculture to Pop Culture

How Tattoos Went From Subculture to Pop Culture

May 11, 2017

Interesting article from Mik Thobo-Carlsenrlsen  Let’s face it, tattoos have burst onto pop culture and have taken over the current media scenery. TV shows based on the tattoo industry are springing up on major networks, social media pages for tattoo culture are numbering in the millions of followers, and you would be hard pressed to take a walk on the street and not see several people sporting leg tats or arm sleeves. Not to mention all the pieces you see on the beach! Tattoos have become a mainstream part of society. Today, 36 percent of Americans aged 18-25 have at least one tattoo, according to a report done by the Pew Research Center. That’s more than one third of America’s young adults! It comes as no surprise that the tattoo industry is the sixth fastest-growing retail business in America, as determined by the U.S. News & World Report. This has obviously translated to online interest as well, as there are more than 147 million tattoo related searches each month on Google. How did this industry achieve this status though? Tattoos have certainly been scrutinized in the past and a visible feature that was once taboo has now become... normal? Twenty five years ago, tattoos were actually quite common... on sailors, prison inmates, and members of tough motorcycle gangs. If you looked at accountants, pro ping-pong players, or shoe salesmen though, it would have been pretty rare to find some ink. So what happened? Ironically, tattoos have been around since the beginning of human history. The word tattoo is thought to be derived from both the Polynesian “ta” — meaning “to strike” — and the Tahitian “tatau” — meaning “to mark.” So when and where did the tattoo originate? The answer to this question may remain a mystery, but scientific evidence proves that tattoos have been a part of human culture for thousands of years. In 1991, German hikers on the Oztal Alps (near the border between Italy and Austria) discovered the mummified remains of a prehistoric human. Carbon dating would prove that the human, named Ötzi, had been mummified more than 5,300 years ago. While Ötzi was discovered with primitive tools and arrows, his most unique feature was that his body was adorned with no less than 57 tattoos, all the way from his upper neck to his ankles. Findings like this continuously have proven that tattoos have been a part of human societies since their inception, as parts of rituals and cultures throughout history and across the globe. Fast-forward to 2005. Our society still held prejudices against tattoos and, while some people were getting them on their own, no one would say tattoos were a part of pop culture. What changed this? The moment tattoos stepped into society’s limelight can be pinpointed to a very specific event: the launching of the first popular tattoo TV show, “Miami Ink”. A legendary shop on South Beach, “Miami Ink” housed a unique mix of talented and charismatic tattoo artists. Before this show, only the minority of people with tattoos knew what the inside of a tattoo studio was like. People weren’t privy to the amazing work being done there or to the dynamic personalities and various styles of different artists. It made for good TV though, so Miami Ink owner, Ami James, linked up with a major network and ran this reality TV show in his shop. It was a huge success and it changed everything. Nine years later, Miami Ink has had six seasons and been aired in over 160 countries. Spin-off shows based on other shops (NY Ink and LA Ink, most notably) as well as Contest-Format shows (Ink Master) have also been largely successful. The shows opened the channels for the average Joe to look into this “underworld” of tattoos. To realize that the art is impressive, beautiful, and attainable. Every person can have an amazing tattoo. Every person can have their own unique tattoo. Having a tattoo can be an expression of who you are. Or what you believe in. Or something you cherish. Or just something you thought was fun. The prejudice, not having disappeared completely, is certainly greatly diminished. Tattoo artists became celebrities. Artists like Ami James, Tommy Montoya, Kat von D, and Megan Massacre became famous for their appearances on these shows. Their art was suddenly the focus of mainstream media and their skills were known to all. Everyone wanted to get inked by them. So, naturally, other celebrities started getting inked by them. Rihanna, David Beckham, Angelina Jolie, and Adam Levine, are several examples of mainstream media icons that have tattoos and openly display them. It’s a part of who they are now. And fans of these and many other celebrities are now getting inked just like their idols. Enter social media. Another game-changer for the tattoo industry. The same artists that gained celebrity status on the tattoo TV shows are now followed by millions of people on these platforms (and some of these followers don’t even have any tattoos of their own!). These same popular artists, or the individual users themselves, can identify new artists — the up-and-comers — that impress all with their unique and groundbreaking designs. Tattoo conventions are exploding in popularity, as everyone wants the chance to meet their favorite artists, post a picture with them on their profiles, and maybe even get a tattoo! And tattoo shops are now the place of legend — the home of major tattoo artists and a site to see in and of itself. So what’s next? The internet will naturally allow the tattoo industry to continue evolving in ground-breaking ways in order to deliver the best possible content and services for the millions of tattoo-culture followers out there. The gap between the tattoo fan and the artist will get smaller and smaller with these new internet-based platforms and we can already see this trend in sites that offer crowd-sourcing for tattoo designs, such as Tattoodo, where people are linked to artists from all over the world in order to obtain customized tattoo designs. Together with the growing mainstream tattoo community, we anxiously await to see the crazy ways this industry will continue to develop and take over pop culture. This post is co-authored by Victor Chateaubriand.
Japanese body suits are finally up!

Japanese body suits are finally up!

May 11, 2017

We recently acquired 5 original Japanese body suits from the talented Brazillian artist Deneka Horiden. They are temporarily framed up and mounted inside the bulk head of our reception area and they look fab! They will be re-framed without glass to capture the detail without the light glare of the glass, but for now, at least they are up! You can check out more of this artists work at https://www.facebook.com/paulo.deneka and also a big thank you to Scottt at www.scottofalltrades.com.au for some impressive mounting! Stay tuned for more shop renos, improvements and our continual effort in featuring beautiful artwork in our studio gallery.  

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